Networking Tag

Top 10 Takeaways from Day 1 of #BMA15

[caption id="attachment_3175" align="aligncenter" width="400"] Google's Jim Lecinski presents at #BMA15 Photo Credit: DejaViewsUSA.com[/caption] The Tell Your Story team proudly joined more than 950 fellow b2b marketers for Day 1 of the world’s biggest and best b2b marketing event, BMA15. In addition to staffing the press room and managing press for the conference, our team soaked up a plethora of valuable ideas, insights and takeaways that we can apply to our b2b marketing programs and careers. The conference has our entire team inspired and energized to “Be More.” Here are our top 10 takeaways from Day 1 of BMA15: [caption id="attachment_3177" align="alignright" width="325"] The number of B2B searches has tripled in the past two years. Photo credit: DejaViewsUSA.com[/caption] Millennials now make up almost half (46%) of b2b buyers. Reach them via mobile and video, or get left behind. Data, data, data! We don't need more dashboards, we need insights to guide decisions. There’s...

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Let’s Just Call It Marketing: Content Marketing World ’14 Recap

Watch Our Video Recap of Content Marketing World 2014 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gro1xK66wIE Read Our Recap of Content Marketing World 2014: For various reasons, some people hate the phrase “content marketing.” To me, after attending the 4th annual Content Marketing World, it is clear that content marketing is just marketing.  And always has been.  So let’s drop the word content and call it Marketing World.  What do you think? Anyway, the name aside and with the spotlight shining on what we love to do as communicators, there is a golden opportunity to get back to concentrating on the fun and impactful side of marketing – developing and telling great stories.  The themes that resonated with me the most were around developing stories that are emotional, inspirational and aspirational.  We heard about developing an editorial mentality, and to think like TV producers and film directors.  We were challenged to think about the elements of a great story. And although one...

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The Art of Social Selling #BMA14

[caption id="attachment_1976" align="alignleft" width="233"] #SocialSelling expert Jill Rowley[/caption] Dispatches from BMA14: Series of Short Reports from the Tell Your Story Team at #BMA14 in Chicago   Social selling expert Jill Rowley rocked the #BMA14 crowd this morning and discussed how we can do a better job communicating with prospects using social media. Her presentation was excellent as she kept emphasizing,  “It isn’t always about closing, it is about always being connected.”   The biggest change in the market is using social media channels to engage with your audience.  Stop trying to be a “quota crusher,” she implored sales professionals. Rather, connect with your audience in a meaningful way.  She supported this with a great stat: 78 percent of sales professionals who use social media to build connections outsell their peers.   She also reviewed a bit of research that shows that it takes approximately 8 cold calls to reach a prospect, and of those people reached, only 2%...

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You Should Be Proud of Your BMA Chapter Leaders

Dispatches from BMA14: Series of Short Reports from the Tell Your Story Team at #BMA14 in Chicago     On the eve of #BMA14, we had the opportunity to attend BMA Chapter Leader Day in Chicago as a pre-conference event. There must have been nearly 75 chapter leaders in attendance from cities across North America. Some were there to figure out how to start a BMA chapter in their city. Others were there to share their knowledge on what has worked and what hasn’t. Everyone was there to learn to make their chapter better and more valuable for their members.   Bottom line is that we should all be proud of our chapter leaders. Long time national board members Elton Mayfield (Kansas City) and Greg Olson (Colorado) stressed time and time again throughout the day (and at previous chapter leader days) that the chapter is the heart beat of BMA. Without strong chapters, the national...

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5 Ways to Maximize Trade Shows with PR and Social Media

Let’s face it. Trade shows are expensive. Between renting the booth space, paying for your team’s travel expenses, creating an attractive booth, printing literature, and purchasing giveaway items, trade shows can be a major investment and eat up a large portion of your overall marketing budget. So why not maximize your spend by using public relations and social media at the show? Here are 5 of the ways that we support our clients at tradeshows— before, during and after—with “SocialPR.”     [caption id="attachment_1370" align="alignright" width="200"] Amanda facilitating media interview atGreat American Truck Show for clientOnRamp Transportation Services.[/caption] 1) Meet the press. Journalists in your industry are attending your trade shows and looking for new content to write about. Ask the show organizers for an attending press list and reach out to those journalists to set up appointments in your booth. Designate a subject matter expert to tell journalists about everything new happening with your company and...

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Back to School Means Back to Networking

I had a great last several days of summer. I was fortunate enough to stay flexible with my work schedule while spending a lot of time with my 7-year-old son who was in between summer camp and the start of school. A portion of that time was called “Daddy Camp” and I hope it will be an August tradition.

 

Although you may think all good things must come to an end, I couldn’t be more excited. As my son embarks onto a new adventure to 2nd grade, I get to rev up my networking engines. And I started it last night by attending the Chicago Business Marketing Association (BMA) membership event on a rooftop overlooking a Cubs game at historic Wrigley Field.

 

Yes, the Cubs lost, but it was still a great night. Networking with marketing folks energizes me and helps me prioritize my professional thinking and goals. I meet new people and connect with old friends. We catch up, talk, make connections and hopefully walk away with that something extra that can help us take the next step in our professional lives.

 

Whether it’s BMA, an alumni association or any other formal or informal group, back to school means back to networking. Take advantage of the buzz in the air and make it work for you.

 

P.S. I’m biased, but the Chicago BMA is the best place to do marketing networking in the city. Check out www.bmachicago.org for a schedule of events.

How to Make the Most of Trade Shows & Live Events

Hubspot Social PR NewsOur team is gearing up for back-to-back trade shows this week and happened to come across Hubspot’s timely article, “Getting the Most From Live Events: A Guide for Attendees, Hosts & Participants.” The article reported a shocking statistic – 80% of companies don’t even follow up with leads after trade shows.

 

How can that be? With every wise business person shouting, “NETWORK!” from the rooftops, how are marketers ignoring this advice when it comes to the biggest networking opportunity there is — face-to-face live events.

 

If you jump on over to Hubspot (link above) they’ve outlined in detail how attendees, exhibitors, speakers, and event hosts can take full advantage of these opportunities. Here are three quick tips we’ve developed:

 

  1. How to remember people: If your goal is to network (which it should be) it may be hard to remember all those faces and names once you’ve got a stack of business cards in front of you. Jot down notes about who you’re meeting or what you spoke about on the backside of their card in order to jog your memory later. Be prepared for high-tech folks with digital business cards – here are 8 free business card apps suggested by Mashable.
  2. How to stay on task: It’s extremely easy to get caught up in the commotion of an event and end up getting sidetracked. Don’t waste the money you’ve invested to attend the event by ending up in the corner catching up with old friends. Make sure you define your goal before you step through the front door. Go in with a purpose and don’t forget to follow through.
  3. How to break through the noise: No doubt there will be many other individuals and companies with the same goals or agenda as you, so you must go in prepared to stand out from the rest. Be ready to market yourself competitively. Give out free samples of your products or services to drive traffic towards your booth, or come up with some other creative ways to set yourself and your booth apart.

 

How are you getting your ROI for live events? We’d like to hear your methods of maximizing your investment of time, money and energy by fostering relationships that last past the showroom floor.

Six Types of Networkers Everyone’s Met

Types of Social Community NetworkersNote: We originally developed a list of “types of networkers” in 2009 and were inspired to refresh and republish. It served as a great conversation starter at a recent Business Marketing Association Chicago event, and we think it can help people improve who they are as a networker. 

 

It’s about to be that time of year again when we in the business world reexamine our (now digital) Rolodexes and start thinking about the connections we’ve made over the past year. For some of us that means embarking on an office scavenger hunt to gather up the dozens of business cards we’ve collected over the last 12 months. For others it means finally getting around to connecting with our coworkers on LinkedIn.

 

We are also going into the holiday portion of the networking season where good cheer and business cards are exchanged liberally. Networking, my friends, both online and face-to-face, is as important as ever.

 

It’s an undeniable fact that if there is one key to success in the professional environment of the 21st century, it’s networking. So what kind of networker are you? At Tell Your Story we’ve come up with a short list of the different types of networkers we’ve encountered over the years.

 

The “Feel Good” Networker –

You’re fulfilled both professionally and personally by networking. You love the art of networking and everything about it, but you’d rather describe yourself as a people person than a networker. There’s no place you won’t start a conversation with someone new. In fact, you met your most recent client during a layover in Albuquerque. Your friends no longer bother introducing you at parties – they assume everyone already knows you – and your iPhone takes hours to backup the number of contacts in your address book. You love helping others through networking and making connections that make sense. You’re good at it, and it has helped you and others be more successful.

 

The “I Have to Network” Networker –

You’re on the hunt for something, whether it be a new job, new business or a new hire, and you’ve decided to turn to networking. You dust off that stack of business cards you bought a few months back and realize you should have opened the package a lot sooner – hind-sight is always 20/20. You spend the next few days, weeks, or months networking like crazy until that new job is secured, then you shove those business cards back into black hole that is your desk drawer and await the next time you need them.

 

The “I Hate Networking” Networker –

You know who you are. Whenever you see a networking article on your Google Reader feed you sigh deeply. You get it, networking is important, but you’re holding out for the study that proves it’s just a fad. Besides, you can’t figure out where these people find the time to go to after work events and be active in professional organizations without sacrificing a personal life. You show up only to the events you’re obligated to attend and quickly make an exit when the opportunity presents itself. At the end of the day you pack up and head home and that’s the way you like it.

 

The “Uncomfortable” Networker

You’ve read books, attended seminars and even resorted to infomercial kits about networking. However, there’s a big gap between theory and practice and no matter how much time and money you invest, you just can’t seem to get comfortable doing it. Instead of making that first step you wait for someone to approach you. Many times you’ve found solace in clinging to the “I Hate Networking” Networker while nervously sipping your club soda and checking your watch – and at the end of the night you realize you forgot to ask for his/her card.

 

The “Obnoxious” Networker –

You go into every interaction with an agenda to make contacts and you’re always armed with business cards. Sometimes you get an inkling that the person you approached doesn’t want to hear your elevator speech, but you keep going. Your friends and coworkers roll their eyes at your tactics, but you know they work – you have successfully established an extensive database of contacts. This holiday season you’re slipping a networking book into the office grab bag and you don’t care who thinks that’s obnoxious.

 

The “You Should Go Network” Networker –

You’re a distant cousin of the “Feel Good” and “Obnoxious” Networkers. You love networking and have seen its benefits influence your own life. Now you want everyone you know to follow your lead. You instantly shoot emails to your friends and coworkers about networking opportunities and in the past you’ve had to fight off the urge to create a LinkedIn account for your spouse. Some people may call you pushy, but you know that you’re just giving good advice – even if it’s unwanted. “I Hate Networking” knows you’re right, and they probably hate you for it.

 

Here are some additional types of networkers we’ve heard from you in the past:

 

  • The “Job Hunter” Networker – Signs up for volunteer committees, then disappears once employed. Contributed by Cindy Droog @cindydroog.
  • The “Connector” Networker – Taking a page out of Malcolm Gladwell’s “The Tipping Point,” the connector builds bridges by offering up their contacts as resources to others. Contributed by Dick Strassburger @strass.
  • The “Networking Makes Me Feel Dirty” Networker – Feels as if networking is a dirty art perfected by politicians and copied by business professionals for their own gain. Contributed by Karrie Sullivan @shecanmarketing.

 

What are your thoughts about the category you fit into and what other types of networkers have you found out there?